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Bake Sale


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    Children's Museum Of Houston

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Bake Sale

This activity helps learners learn about math through a real-world scenario. Three friends are baking cookies for their school’s bake sale. Using real or pretend cookies and plates, learners figure out how many plates they need to fit a certain number of cookies. Then they calculate how many batches of cookies they need to make for the bake sale. This activity guide includes questions to ask, extensions, resources, standards, and blackline masters.

Quick Guide


Preparation Time:
Under 5 minutes

Learning Time:
5 to 10 minutes

Estimated Materials Cost:
$1 - $5 per group of students

Age Range:
Ages 8 - 11

Resource Types:
Activity, Lesson/Lesson Plan

Language:
English

Materials List (per group of students)


  • Pretend cookies (or pictures of cookies)
  • Plates
  • Paper and pencils

Subjects


  • Mathematics
    • Algebra
      • Equations and Inequalities
    • Data Analysis and Probability
      • Data Analysis
      • Data Representation
    • Number and Operations
      • Fractions
      • Multiples and Factors
      • Operations
    • Problem Solving
    • Reasoning and Proof
    • Representation

Informal Categories


  • Food and Cooking

Audience


To use this activity, learners need to:

  • see
  • touch

Learning styles supported:

  • Uses STEM to solve real-world problems
  • Involves hands-on or lab activities

Other


Includes alignment to state and/or national standards

Common Core State Standards for Mathematics:

  • CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3: Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.(more info about this benchmark)
  • CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.C.7: Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.(more info about this benchmark)

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Access Rights:

  • Free access

By:

Rights:

  • All Rights Reserved, Children's Museum of Houston,

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